Banners

Banners are made from interlocking or overlapping elements of clay and /or driftwood, bound together to be hung on the wall.

Stream wash away (text by Kathleen Raine)

Stream wash away is made from driftwood from the Thames in the form of an improvised grave-marker, and also references a waymarker or signpost. The text is from Kathleen Raine’s poem Spell against sorrow, and the banner measures 48cm high x 38cm wide. I made it in 2009. (Private collection)

Banners banner

Banners banner is a banner made from 48 clay flags woven together with silk strands. I made it in 2007, and wrapped it round a huge pillar in Journey from Winter, my exhibition at the Southbank Centre’s Poetry Library in 2008. The dimensions are a bit variable: each flag measures at least 22cm x 14cm, and the whole banner is about 1.5 m x 2.5 m, as hung here.

The text is from a poem by Valentine Ackland:

And love wells within me and spills over the world

Because of the unknown dark and the great banners unfurled

Out there beyond me; that beyond which folds

About us, warm as life, and is our life, and holds

Our days and deaths and births within its sheltering folds.

(from Every Autumn a wind by Valentine Ackland)

Yes Banner is made from 24 strips of clay woven together with embroidery silks and hung like an open scroll between copper pipes. The text is by Muriel Rukeyser.
Signed one-off. 30cm wide x 80cm long. This work is not for sale.

Source (driftwood banner by Liz Mathews) text by Kathleen Raine

Source is a banner made from pieces of driftwood from the Thames, hung from a driftwood bar with reclaimed copper fixings and knotted hemp cord; the text is carved and incised into the wood, which is worn into intricate shapes and whorls by the river; by Kathleen Raine, it reads:

Implicit in each beginning is its end.

Signed one-off. 58cm x 90cm (approx). For sale £300

Peace on earth banner by Liz Mathews

This is a peace banner, or invocation.  Strips of clay, string and copper pipe.

Signed. One-off in a group of Peace banners with peace invoking inscriptions, in different forms and colours. For sale from £60.

Pattern by Liz Mathews (text by Virginia Woolf)

Pattern is made from a single slab of clay torn into strips and hung lengthwise from a stack of driftwood with hemp and silk thread. The text is by Virginia Woolf.

Signed one-off. 50cm wide x 70cm long (max). For sale £250

The Kingfisher banner is made from 6 panels of clay hung from a bright blue washing line. The text is by Virginia Woolf:

Hail happiness! Kingfisher flashing from bank to bank

Signed one-off. Each panel 32cm; the whole banner is about 2.6m wide. This one’s sold, but it’s part of a group of longways banners in different texts and colours, from £300 to £500 (usually about £50-£90 a panel, depending on size and text).

Harvest is made from strips of clay torn from the edges of another work (Stele, see Treasure in Earth page), hung between driftwood panels with hemp rope and string. The text (by Edith Sitwell) is lettered in earthy browns, ochres and golds.

Signed one-off. 42cm high x 38cm wide (max). Sold.

Blake's graffiti by Liz Mathews (text by Kathleen Raine)

Blake’s graffiti is a banner made from driftwood, in this case parts of a wooden winebox washed up on the Thames beach on the Southbank. The fragments are bound together with linen tape and linen paper, and the text is from a poem by Kathleen Raine. The ultimately optimistic text looks out to city skies, invoking Blake’s vision of an Earth redeemed by humanity’s enlightenment.

Signed one-off; 88cm x 33cm; for sale £200

Thames song  by Liz Mathews

Thames song is a banner combining strips of clay with driftwood from the Thames, bound with knotted linen cord and clay beads with metal washers. The text is my own.

Signed one-off; 80cm x 35cm approx; for sale £250. Now sold.

Work available for purchase changes regularly – please email me for information about similar work for sale now –  click on contact details.

All photos copyright Liz Mathews.

Permission is needed for any use of these images.



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